This is how many friends people have made through virtual gatherings during lockdown

The average American has made six new friends as a result of attending virtual gatherings during quarantine, according to new research.

A poll of 2,000 Americans found 83 percent of those who have made a new, virtual friend are excited to meet up with them in real life and grow their friendship.

In fact, to qualify as a new “friend” made in quarantine, 61 percent said they had to first make tentative plans to hang out in-person when it is safe to do so.

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The survey, conducted by OnePoll in conjunction with Evite, aimed to discover how Americans’ relationships have evolved during the COVID-19 pandemic.

It uncovered that those in quarantine are not only making new friends, but they’re also reconnecting with an average of six people they had lost touch with in the past.

Seven in 10 have recently connected with people they haven’t talked to in over a year. Forty-four percent are reconnecting with friends from high school while a further 36 percent are reconnecting with buds from childhood.

The survey found 53 percent agreed they’re missing face-to-face interactions with their loved ones the most.

Forty-four percent of those polled miss celebrating important life milestones with friends and family and 74 percent went on to say they rely on having scheduled check-ins with friends and loved ones as a way to stay positive.

Eighty-four percent also said they find it important for friends and loved ones to check in on each other at least once during the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to those surveyed, a quick text or phone call with a caring tone to check if one needs anything will suffice and 70 percent say they will remember those who checked in with them when life returns to normal.

“Our relationships with each other are so powerful right now, even if we can’t be physically together,” said Zaria Zinn, celebration expert at Evite. “It’s great to see people checking in and reconnecting.

“During this time apart, a little goes a long way toward brightening someone’s day, whether it’s having a scheduled video chat, celebrating milestones with a virtual party, or just sending a sweet card.”

Although Americans miss connecting in person, 48 percent of those surveyed said they feel comfortable attending virtual social gatherings, while another 41 percent said they are gathering online because they find friendship important right now.

Another part of life Americans are missing? Date night. Twenty-nine percent of Americans are getting their fill of social interaction by finding ways to date while physically apart.

Single Americans are going on an average of five romantic dates during the quarantine.

Over half (53 percent) claim their standards on dating apps are changing with positive results and 52 percent are excited to take their virtual romance to a real life, romantic setting once stay-at-home orders are lifted.

“People will come out of quarantine with new friends – and maybe even a potential romantic partner – because we’re spending more time getting to know each other virtually,” added Zinn. “We’re eager to connect with loved ones face to face again and I think we’ll find people prioritizing companionship and connection more than ever before when we’re on the other side of this.”

Top five things Americans miss most about life pre-COVID-19

  1. Face-to-face interactions: 54 percent
  2. Celebrating big life milestones with friends and family: 44 percent
  3. Hugging others: 39 percent
  4. Having date nights: 36 percent
  5. Going to a local bar with friends: 33 percent

Top five reasons Americans attend virtual gatherings

  1. Feels comfortable: 48 percent
  2. Stay in touch with friends and family: 44 percent
  3. I find prioritizing friendships to be very important these days: 40 percent
  4. Boost social connections: 39 percent
  5. Can avoid putting makeup on: 31 percent